August 2011 Archives

In a letter to Education Secretary Arne Duncan, the 10-member group Chiefs for Change say the Race to the Top winners must be held accountability for fully implementing their plans.


In a radio interview, President Barack Obama gave education advocates some hope.


Nearly 600 school districts, nonprofits, and groups of schools applied by the Aug. 2 deadline for the second round of the Investing in Innovation grant competition, worth $150 million this year.


Eleven states, including Colorado and Louisiana, are considered top contenders to share $500 million in grants as part of the U.S. Department of Education third round of Race to the Top, which is focused on early learning.


We learned from Arne Duncan's first Twitter town hall that 10 days of testing is too much, merit pay for teachers should be voluntary, and that the U.S. Secretary of Education is a Twitter "novice."


The U.S. Department of Education has quietly invited states and schools using the most popular of four school improvement models to apply for some extra time to figure out the trickiest component of the federal turnaround strategy.


In case you've been living under a rock, the D.C. metropolitan area just experienced a 5.8 magnitude earthquake. Naturally, this has major implications for K-12 policy that are best explored through Twitter.


States seeking some of the $500 million in new Race to the Top money have until Oct. 19 to say how they will improve early education programs through new standards, assessments, and rating systems.


In this Q-and-A with author Steven Brill, he questions whether Hawaii and New York deserved their Race to the Top awards.


Texas gets a mixed report card on class sizes, funding, and college- and career-ready standards. But things aren't as bad as US. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan says.


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and his staff considered several options as they tried to put Louisiana and Colorado in the Race to the Top winners' circle, the author says, even though the outside judges had scored them too low.


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, unequivocally and in no uncertain terms, said today that states absolutely do not have to participate in Common Core in order to qualify for one of the department's to-be-determined NCLB waivers.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan feels "very, very badly" for the children in Texas, where Republican Gov. Rick Perry has pushed through policies that have raised class sizes and cut funding, according to an interview Duncan gave on Bloomberg Television's "Political Capital With Al Hunt" airing Aug. 19- 20.


Some light beach reading for Politics K-12 readers soaking up the last couple weeks of summer: Eduwonk has some absolutely priceless back-and-forth between Diane Ravitch, and Simon & Shuster, the publishers of Class Warfare, Steven Brill's recent book on K-12 politics. If you haven't already, check out this very interesting profile of Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, a Republican presidential candidate. There's a lot in there on education, including on the charter school that she started for at-risk kids in Minnesota. The school nearly lost its charter because it embraced a religious viewpoint. Bachmann and another founder eventually resigned, and the ...


Montana gets to reset its proficiency targets so more schools make adequate yearly progress this year, under a deal reached with the U.S. Department of Education.


Washington state is unlikely to seek wiggle room from unspecified parts of the No Child Left Behind, in exchange for embracing certain, also unspecified, reforms.


Two GOP candidates were asked if they would continue to enforce the No Child Left Behind Act, as president. The answer was an emphatic "no"


A group of House Democrats want the U.S. Department of Agriculture to quickly finalize its proposed sweeping changes to rules about school breakfasts and lunches.


NSBA and AASA argue that, if the department wants to provide some relief from NCLB, they should do it in a state-by-state, case-by-case basis


Folks have been waiting with baited breath to find out who, exactly, is on this so-called super committee. And education advocates probably broke open the champagne when they heard that Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., was going to co-chair.


By forgoing work on a data system for teacher information, California may be jeopardizing its nearly $6 billion State Fiscal Stabilization Fund grant.


Texas Gov. Rick Perry has opposed Race to the Top and the Common Core State Standards Initiative, both key pieces of President Barack Obama's education agenda.


State officials give a thumbs-up to the idea of wiggle room from the requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act, but others sound a note of caution.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will spell out in September what states will have to do to get waivers under the No Child Left Behind Act.


Based on states that have already reported their "adequate yearly progress" or AYP results, the failure rate for schools may not be nearly as the high as the 82 percent that U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan predicted.


The compromise legislation that will raise the debt ceiling will create new federal spending caps, which are likely to affect education, advocates warn.


The agreement worked out between the White House and congressional negotiators would avoid dire cuts to the $23 billion program.


As more states ask the U.S. Department of Education from relief NCLB, federal officials gave Idaho approval to bypass one piece of the nation's school accountability law.


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