February 2012 Archives

California officials, saying the Obama administration's requirements for a waiver from the No Child Left Behind Act are unrealistic, nonetheless asks federal officials to provide their own version of flexbility.


Twenty-six more states, plus the District of Columbia, are seeking flexibility under the No Child Left Behind law. They will be notified by the U.S. Department of Education this spring if their applications pass muster.


The pair of bills introduced by the head of the House education committee would scale back the federal role in education and give states much more running room when it comes to K-12 policy.


Republican governors don't necessarily think President Barack Obama is a snob for pushing college or post-secondary training for all students.


Will education spending become a campaign issue? Find out at State Ed Watch....


Bethany Little, who has served Chairman Tom Harkin's top education aide, is leaving the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee to join America Achieves.


Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., introduced revised versions of the legislation today. So far, the bill has picked up one official endorsement, from the American Association of School Administrators


It's official. On Tuesday, the House education committee will consider a pair of bills to remake the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Districts, schools, and nonprofits that want a shot at a $3 million "development" grant under the U.S. Department of Education's Investing in Innovation competition must complete a pre-application by April 9.


The U.S. Department of Education says it will make sure the states that win waivers under No Child Left Behind are providing "transparency" around subgroup performance—especially in states that are using a "super-subgroup."


News of a school turnaround firm's experience in Pueblo, Colo., could fuel arguments on Capitol Hill that the four models spelled out in the School Improvement Grant program aren't the right way to go


Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, said he would eliminate the No Child Left Behind Act, although his campaign website acknowledges some important duties the federal government has in K-12 education.


During a hearing today on the House GOP bills to rewrite the No Child Left Behind Act, lawmakers examined the role of the federal government in school turnarounds and teacher evaluations.


The state becomes the 11th to be given flexibility from some provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act in the first-round of waivers granted by the U.S. Department of Education.


States that need more time to work on their NCLB waiver proposals can seek a one-year freeze in their annual achievement targets to keep the list of schools not making AYP from growing.


The peer reviewers who judged the first round of No Child Left Behind waiver proposals found significant weaknesses in state plans, especially concerning special education students and English learners.


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is scheduled to pump up the administration's proposal for a brand new $5 billion competitive grant program to get states and districts to work with teachers, unions, education schools and others to totally retool the teaching profession.


In a letter from Maine's Stephen Bowen and New Hampshire's Virginia Barry sent to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today, the two said they need more time to figure out how to make the department's requirements for a waiver under No Child Left Behind mesh with their rural states


Obama is asking for $5 billion for a new competitive grant fund aimed at teacher quality, and an $850 million extension of his Race to the Top franchise. But major formula programs, such as Title I, would see flat funding, advocates say.


A majority of urban districts think SIG will make a difference in the long-run for schools that are struggling the most, according to a report released today by the Council of the Great City Schools, an organization in Washington which represents 65 of the nation's largest school districts.


Ten states were granted waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act today: Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Oklahoma and Tennesse—some of them conditionally. New Mexico will have to wait.


The federal role in K-12 education would be almost entirely eviscerated under a bill introduced today by Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee.


President Obama is expected to make some big asks on higher-education, including a Race to the Top for colleges, in his budget proposal, due out Monday.


President Obama hosts the 2nd White House science fair, and unveils some new STEM initiatives.


State finances are beginning to rebound, a survey finds, and states are making progress on some policies pushed by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, especially data-systems, and standards and assessments.


Congressmen John Kline and Duncan Hunter ask the IRS to craft proposed pension rules in a way that does not prevent charter school employees from taking part in state retirement plans.


School superintendents, principals, and school board members found a lot to like in a draft bill to renew the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


The National Governor's Association wants Congress to give states lots of running room when it comes to crafting their accountability plans, according to an interim proposal outlining NGA's priorities for reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Charter school advocates are worried about a notice of proposed rulemaking that they say could force states to ban charter school teachers from taking part in state retirement plans.


States that have seen big explosions in population also would see a big jump in federal funding for teacher quality under a little noticed provision of a draft bill to renew the No Child Left Behind Act introduced by U.S. Rep. John Kline, R-Minn.


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