March 2012 Archives

Florida got a waiver under the No Child Left Behind Act giving districts freedom from having to set aside money for tutoring, but the state legislature stepped in and will keep the requirement for at least next school year.


U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, is proposing legislation that would provide $20 billion to modernize schools, $60 billion to hire teachers, and $10 billion to provide professional development to educators.


The clash between the Obama administration's support for Race to the Top and other grant programs, and folks in Congress who want bigger investments in funding for special education and disadvantaged students, is not going away anytime soon.


Chief state school officers came up to Washington this week to hear lawmakers explain why one of their top federal priorities, an honest to goodness reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, won't get done this year.


Applications for the $150 million Investing in Innovation contest are due to the U.S. Department of Education by May 29.


During a four-day on-site visit to Hawaii, officials from the U.S. Department of Education will look for "clear and compelling" evidence that the state is making good on promises it made in its winning Race to the Top plan.


State education chiefs told U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan they oppose the idea of federal officials bypassing states and working directly with districts on No Child Left Behind Act flexibility.


While Georgia, Ohio, North Carolina, and New York get some high marks for Race to the Top progress, Florida and Hawaii still flounder, a new Center for American Progress report says.


The U.S. Department of Education will use $550 million to run two Race to the Top competitions, but important details are still to be worked out.


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan warned lawmakers today of potentially dire ramifications if the budget blueprint put forth earlier this week by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., were to become law.


Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the godfather of the reformey-minded Chiefs for Change and an education force in statehouses around the country, has endorsed former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney for president.


States have taken different tacks in awarding districts money under the federal School Improvement Grants, according to a new report from the Center for American Progress.


U.S. Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee, wants Congress to put more money into grants to states for special education.


State officials are generally optimistic about the School Improvement Grant program's potential but have a lot of ideas for perfecting it, an advocacy and research group finds.


The department has begun crunching data for about 700 of the roughly 850 schools that entered the program back in the 2010-11 school year.


Top U.S. Department of Education officials are signaling that once states are given a chance to apply for waivers in September during a third round of judging, federal officials plan to open up some sort of flexibility options for districts, too.


An overwhelming majority of school districts don't think they'll be able to absorb a big, blunt federal funding cut headed their way if Congress can't reach a deal on long-term spending by January 2013, according to a survey released today by the American Association of School Administrators.


The movie, "Speak Up," is described as capturing the real, everyday stories of kids who were bullied. It premieres Sunday.


Romney has added language to his Web site sketching out his views on education.


The U.S. Department of Agriculture is under fresh scrutiny for allowing beef product dubbed "pink slime" in school lunches.


Two programs that lost funding when Congress revised its rules on earmarks, Teach for America and the National Writing Project, will get some federal money after all, under a new $24.6 million competitive program.


Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, has been working for months on a big, omnibus-style bill aimed at bolstering the middle class.


The key architect of the No Child Left Behind Act is among the team of advisers working on Gov. Romney's education policy proposals.


The U.S. Department of Education has doubled its team of peer reviewers as it weighs 27 applications for waivers under No Child Left Behind.


Mildred Otero will take over the top staff job on the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, the position left vacant by Bethany Little's departure.


Are Santorum and Romney on the same page when it comes to standardized testing?


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