June 2012 Archives

Five more states, including Virginia--a state that did not sign onto the Common Core State Standards--have received wiggle room from the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act.


The new group hopes to push forward federal anti-bullying legislation that has languished and increase state and local efforts to combat bullying.


Transitions and turnaround schools in state waiver plans raised eyebrows over at the George W. Bush Institute.


Want to win your office betting pool on the Race to the Top District competition? A survey of "education insiders" recently published by Whiteboard Advisers puts the smart money on Los Angeles Unified


Lawmakers are close to a deal on keeping student loan rates stable for another year, according to a Senate aide; an agreement could be announced as early as Monday or Tuesday.


Members of Congress want to know how a series of planned across-the-board budget cuts looming for the federal government would impact education programs, even though Congress came up with the plan.


Iowa is the first state to get the thumbs-down from the U.S. Department of Education on its application for a waiver from the requirements of the NCLB law.


Would seeing 857 desks just sitting on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., get your attention. The College Board is sure hoping so, especially if your name happens to be Barack Obama or Mitt Romney.


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan issues a statement reiterating that Obama administration has not changed its position on the D.C. voucher program, and does not supporting expanding it. A day earlier, House Speaker John Boehner, a Republican, said a deal had been reached with the administration to do that. there is no day after House Speaker John Boehner a


White House officials invited bloggers to a summit Tuesday to learn about the Obama administration's education record. Here's how Politics K-12 covered it in on Twitter: [View the story "White House Holds Online Education Summit" on Storify]...


Should states and schools be able to use federal dollars originally aimed at afterschool and summer learning programs to add extra time to the school day? The Senate appropriations committee says yes.


The Obama administration had proposed cutting off funding for a District of Columbia voucher program in fiscal 2013, a move that angered conservatives.


A bill approved by the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee would add a "whole school reform" model to the four controversial school turnaround choices now spelled out in the federal School Improvement Grant program.


Two key K-12 formula programs—Title I grants for districts and state grants for special education—would see slight boosts in a bill approved on a party line vote Tuesday by the Senate subcommittee that oversees education spending.


Everyone from groups representing governors, state and local school officials, and think tanks to individual citizens are commenting on the U.S. Department of Education's draft rules for the Race to the Top for districts.


The government agency analyzed reports that offered some conflicting information about the extent of bullying and whether it affects some groups more compared to others.


The White House announced today that the Education Department will work to make it easier for students to repay their loans.


Only three states--Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota--chose to continue buying beef that may contain lean finely textured beef for their schools, the Associated Press reported earlier today. Everyone else said they would pay 3 percent more for beef served in school meals that doesn't contain the ingredient. The company that makes beef containing pink slime, Beef Products Inc., is based in South Dakota and has facilities in Iowa and Nebraska.


Back in Massachusetts, then-Gov. Mitt Romney proposed ideas on turnarounds and teacher quality that closely mirror proposals that President Barack Obama put forth just a few years later. Case in point? Romney's turnaround plan, which never got through the Democratically-controlled state legislature, but which called for districts to remove a school's principal, turn schools into charters, and give local leaders more autonomy. Sounds very similar to the School Improvement Grant program to me. Romney was also hoping to tie teacher evaluations to test scores. Read all about it in this story. Some interesting details from Romney's record that didn't make ...


"Lots of these kids have had pretty good experiences," Education Secretary Arne Duncan said. "That's heartwarming," and not something he would have expected as little as five years ago. "Things are going the right way."


By now, ever education blogger has had over a week to hem and haw about Gov. Mitt Romney's education proposals. So if you haven't already, check out these good reads.


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