July 2012 Archives

The U.S. Department of Education got 242 applications for a slice of the nearly $60 million in funding for the program, which helps communities pair education with other services, including pre-kindergarten, health, and arts education.


State waiver applications include a lot of promising practices, but also plenty of potential areas of concern, an analysis by the Center for American Progress found.


U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings were both big NCLB fans back in 2001, but times have changed. Can two of the biggest names in federal education policy find common ground on NCLB?


So there was a big hearing today on the impact of looming across-the-board domestic funding cuts, held by the Senate appropriations panel that deals with education spending. Now, U.S. Rep. George Miller of California, the top Democrat on the House Education Committee, is hoping his panel will follow suit. "Congress has a responsibility [under legislation passed last year] to put forward a balanced and responsible fiscal plan for the nation," Miller said. "To avoid the fiscal cliff, choices will have to be made. The stakes are high for workers, families, and children. I ask that our committee convene a ...


A set of sweeping, across-the-board trigger cuts set to go into effect in January would be "devastating" to education programs, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Democratic lawmakers said at a hearing today.


There's been a lot of chatter in Washington lately on whether Congress will decide to extend language allowing teachers in alternative-certification programs to be considered "highly qualified" for an additional two years.


Children's health advocates warn that preventing an expansion of health insurance coverage for low-income parents not covered by Medicaid could keep some of their children from getting insurance, too, even if those kids are eligible for other coverage.


Key federal education programs wouldn't be cut in the middle of the next school year even if automatic domestic spending cuts go through, according to a letter the U.S. Department of Education sent out to chief state school officers late Friday.


The latest round means the U.S Department of Education has now granted 33 bids for flexibility from parts of the No Child Left Behind Act.


The House subcommittee on education spending votes to scrap key Obama programs, and the bill reignites a debate over NCLB's highly qualified teacher provision.


The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act largely helped save or create education jobs in the wake of the recession, the Center on Education Policy concludes, while boosting education-redesign efforts in a number of states.


The Education Department is set to name seven more waiver recipients, the assistant secretary of elementary and secondary education, tells members of the American Association of School Administrators.


House Republicans are seeking to ax Race to the Top, Investing in Innovation, and the School Improvement Grants while providing a boost for special education.


States with waivers to certain provisions of federal accountability will still have to report data based on those parts of the law.


Advocates for education have a new, big posse to help fight those automatic spending cuts known as "sequestration" which are set to hit almost every federal program on January 2 unless Congress comes up with some sort of big, sweeping deal to stop them.


The Center on Education Policy takes a deep look at the challenges facing those participating in the federal School Improvement Grant Program.


School district administrators and the National Education Association raise dire warnings about across-the-board federal education spending cuts set for early January if Congress doesn't head them off.


State Superintendent John D. Barge doesn't think the teacher effectiveness plan as currently written, is workable.


The two approvals bring the total of approved states to 26, meaning that more than half the states are no longer subject to the accountability system at the heart of the much-maligned NCLB law.


Alabama, Alaska, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, and West Virginia can join Iowa in hitting the pause button on their AMOs for the coming school year while they work on their waiver plans.


If Georgia is unable to address the Education Department's concerns, it could loose roughly $33 million of its $400 million, the portion dedicated to implementing the


In case you hadn't heard, a federal judge struck down a key component of the U.S. Department of Education's controversial "gainful employment"—affecting for-profit colleges—over the weekend.


This is the first time the department has done a "pre-application" for the "development" grants, the smallest, but most sought after the i3 grants.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments