August 2012 Archives

Districts in 48 states plus the District of Columbia plan to apply for the U.S. Department of Education's latest competition, which focuses on personalized learning.


High school students in a women's studies class sort through the fact, fiction, and fuzziness of presidential television spots.


GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney's campaign made the case that he was an advocate for education as governor of Massachusetts.


Former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings thinks the Obama administration's NCLB waivers do poor and minority children a disservice.


Her Wednesday speech to delegates may not have been as sharp as that of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's on Tuesday, but it likely struck a chord.


The Common Core State Standards: A state-led effort to help improve learning outcomes throughout the nation—or "Obama Core?"


From guest blogger Kimberly Shannon...


U.S. Rep. Judy Biggert, R-Ill., wants to help newer members of the House education committee learn to negotiate in a polarized political climate.


Lincoln Tamayo looks forward to a Mitt Romney presidency that would make English immersion the standard approach nationwide for teaching English-language learners.


Republican VP candidate Paul Ryan used his acceptance speech to make the case that President Obama has burdened future generations with billions in unnecessary spending.


Jeb Bush spoke yesterday about GOP Republican presidential politics, Romney, Obama, and whether he's interested in serving as Romney's education secretary.


Virginia has agreed to revise its annual academic targets to make more progress on closing the achievement gap after a firestorm of publicity surrounded its No Child Left Behind waiver plan.


Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam supports a Mitt Romney presidency, but he sees wisdom in some of the education-related work of the Obama administration.


New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's keynote address assails the educational establishment, along with Democratic leadership.


A panel in Tampa during the the Republican National Convention explored the controversial policy and the fictional film putting it in the spotlight.


The GOP platform released Tuesday at the Republican National Convention mirrors Mitt Romney's plans for revamping K-12 education.


Both candidates have good reason to pay special attention young voters, who provide important get-out-the-vote muscle for a campaign.


Rising high school senior Evan Draim, of Virginia, isn't yet 18 but will be in time for the general election.


Tonight's keynote speaker, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, has a national reputation as a union-arm-twisting, voucher-loving, education-budget-trimming chief executive.


With heavy weather bearing down, the GOP shuffles its lineup of events and speakers to stay on message when it comes to education and other issues.


With the Republican National Convention about to kick off, it's time to start speculating about who could be Mitt Romney's education secretary if he is elected.


The Hillsborough County School District has closed at least one school, relocated hundreds of staffers, and will put security officers on some school buses during the four-day convention.


Hawaii has made a lot of progress in implementing its Race to the Top grant, but one key deliverable still eludes the state: a new teachers' contract.


Education Week is headed to Tampa and Charlotte to bring you the latest and greatest from the political conventions.


President Obama gave one of his most significant speeches on K-12 during this election season yesterday, bragging about everything from the administration's plan to offer states waivers to common core.


From guest blogger Kimberly Shannon...


The Obama campaign has released an ad warning that presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney would usher in big cuts to K-12 spending.


President Barack Obama will make education spending a major focus of his next two campaign stops, when he visits the swing states of Ohio and Nevada.


Some congressional races have implications for K-12 policy and spending.


The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is not disclosing basic details about the competition in which Head Start providers are having to reapply for their funds.


First Lady Michelle Obama invited 54 students ages 8 to 12 who submitted recipes for the Healthy Lunchtime Challenge. Students had to create meals that are healthy and tasty.


Less than a week after presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney tapped Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate, President Barack Obama used his weekly radio address to warn the nation of the potentially dire impact of Ryan's budget on K-12 funding.


More than half of the nation's school districts are not eligible to apply on their own for the Race to the Top competition for districts because their enrollments are too small.


A new Obama campaign ad and Rep. Paul Ryan's entrance onto the Republican ticket have put college costs back into the campaign spotlight.


Schools participating in the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program should be able to serve frozen, dried, and canned items, a House committee says, although the program was created to introduce poor children to fresh produce they are unlikely to eat at home.


Applicants have until Oct. 30 to seek grants worth up to $40 million for the biggest districts. The prizes are designed to spur a focus on personalized learning.


Gov. Mitt Romney this morning announced that he's tapping Rep. Paul Ryan , R-Wis., for vice president, a move that puts the debate over how best to put the nation's fiscal house in order front-and-center in the presidential campaign.


Who else will be putting in their resignation this fall?


Nevada joins 33 other states plus the District of Columbia in gaining flexibility through waivers under No Child Left Behind.


The U.S. Department of Education refuses to budge on its decision to place a portion of Georgia's Race to the Top grant on high-risk status.


At the third Bullying Prevention Summit this week in Washington, the nonprofit Ad Council shared a new public service campaign encouraging parents of children who see their peers being bullied to report it.


The U.S. Department of Education is reducing its backlog of public-information requests, but it still takes the agency more than a month on average to fulfill even the simplest requests.


By guest blogger Liana Heitin In sharp contrast to last summer's celebrity-attended rally and march to the White House, the Save Our Schools gathering this year proved a quiet, 150-person affair. Held this weekend in the regal Wardman Park Marriott in downtown Washington, the convention featured presentations on an array of topics including advocacy, social justice, and elevating student voice, and a keynote by author and activist Jonathan Kozol. Attendees also attended workshops during which they crafted official policy stances to eventually present to policymakers (though these sessions were closed to the media). Mike Klonsky, Chicago-based educator and activist who ...


Happy Friday! August is typically a slow month in the education world (no school, lots of folks on vacation) but there's been some interesting news this week.


Bellwether Education, the non-profit education organization co-founded by Andy Rotherham of the still-fabulous Eduwonk blog, is bringing on some new folks—and saying farewell to Kim Smith, another co-founder.


Sandra Abrevaya, former U.S. Department of Education press secretary, is leaving Washington this month to take a different type of gig in the education world: She's becoming the very first executive director of the Chicago office of Urban Alliance.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments