September 2012 Archives

Romney's comments on early childhood education prompted some interesting discussion at a New America Foundation event today.


Mitt Romney doesn't think the federal government should provide support—financial or otherwise—for common standards, which have been adopted by forty-six states and the District of Columbia.


Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., the top Democrat on the House Education committee, is worried that the department isn't holding states feet to the fire when it comes to monitoring graduation rates in states that have received waivers from parts of the No Child Left Behind Act.


Lawmakers have come to an agreement on spending levels for most federal programs for the next six months, and on a sticky issue relating to highly qualified teachers.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan takes to line dancing as part of his back-to-school bus tour.


Obama campaign spokesman Jen Psaki characterized the Chicago teachers' strike as a local political dispute that is not representative of the national debate on education.


Most federal education programs could be cut by 8.2 percent if Congress fails to head off across-the-board spending cuts, the Office of Management and Budget estimates.


A team of "national educators," led by former U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige, to help coordinate support for the GOP presidential candidate's education agenda.


Mitt Romney says Obama has picked his dog in the fight, but the administration wants to stay neutral.


This Storify draws from Edweek coverage of the Democratic National Convention and reaction on social media to capture some of the highlights of the week in Charlotte, N.C.


President Barack Obama says his economic policies would better protect schools and students than those of GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney.


The documentary "Follow the Leader," which was shown at the Democratic National Convention, depicts the maturation of three youths' political beliefs.


Students at Charlotte's Endhaven Elementary school examine the Democratic convention's impact on their community, from business and security to traffic.


Listen to Politics K-12's Alyson Klein discuss the education platforms of both presidential candidates.


Until now, Texas had been noncommittal about whether to seek flexibility under the No Child Left Behind Act from the U.S. Department of Education.


Former federal officials and others tout the academic and economic-development benefits at an Americans for the Arts Action Fund event.


The New Jersey Education Association's vice president doesn't like Race to the Top, but says he still likes President Barack Obama.


There's plenty of K-12 policy action nationally, but Congress can't take much credit, says U.S. Sen. Michael Bennett, D-Colo., former Denver schools chief.


Education Secretary Arne Duncan steered clear of mentioning charter schools, merit pay, and school turnarounds, policies at the core of the Obama administration's agenda.


Young attendees at the Democratic convention say there is an enthusiasm gap on the issue of college access and cost between their party and the GOP.


High school students from a civic and political education foundation use the Democrats' gathering to drill deeper into issues that concern them.


Michelle Rhee, who has angered a core Democratic constituency, teachers' unions, says Mitt Romney's voucher plan is off the mark.


Colorado state Sen. Michael Johnston, architect of a controversial measure toughening teacher evaluation and tenure, talks about getting that 2010 bill into law.


College access, President Obama's education goals, and Republican threats to education were strong themes on the first night of Democratic convention action.


Delegates and union leaders say they'll work to turn out the vote for President Obama in part out of concern about Mitt Romney and the GOP's policy agenda.


Democrats for Education Reform hears from lawmakers who pushed for controversial laws on charter schools and teacher evaluation.


The official Democratic Party platform highlights the importance of evaluations in helping teachers, as well as the Common Core State Standards.


San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, tonight's Democratic convention keynote speaker, has sought to boost college access and early childhood education.


It's clear that not everyone in the Democratic party is ready to give parent-trigger laws five stars.


This year's Democratic National Convention will offer an ususually prominent speaking role for a state schools superintendent: Montana's Denise Juneau.


Drama centers on which parts of President Obama's K-12 record the campaign will trumpet, and how it will resonate with different segments of the party.


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