October 2013 Archives

Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., has released his own bill that would extend the life of Investing in Innovation, which received more than $140 million last year.


The state risks federal grants for English-learners, turnaround schools, special education, and Title I in its clash with the U.S. Department of Education over what tests to give.


States would get an extra incentive to help kids cope with anaphylaxis or severe allergic reactions, under a bill slated for consideration by the Senate education committee tomorrow.


Michael J. Petrilli, vice-president at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, will take the helm of the Institute, serving as president beginning next August.


The Land of Enchantment was among the first states to get a waiver from NCLB law, so the dispute may well be a harbinger of what's to come in other states.


The U.S. Department of Education wants to know what you think about a new proposal to give applicants a leg-up in competitive-grant programs, if their proposals fit with the goals of the administration's interdepartmental "Promise Zone" initiative,


Dorie Turner Nolt takes the reins at the federal Education Department's press office. Meanwhile, John White, who oversaw outreach to rural districts and schools, moves on.


In the midst of all the fiscal drama this year, Impact Aid districts finally got some good news: A chunk of they're owed this year will arrive early.


Mitchell, who is a big champion of reforming schools of education, wouldn't be the first NewSchools talent to come to the department.


Local government education employment posted an the overall gain to 56,400 jobs since June, despite worry about massive layoffs.


School districts would have to conduct comprehensive background checks on any employee with unsupervised access to kids.


Three states, plus the Bureau of Indian Education, are still waiting for a response from the U.S. Department of Education on their waiver requests.


In a letter sent to the department today, these groups express deep concerns about waiver implementation, from how graduation rates are factored into accountability systems to how subgroups of at-risk students are being helped.


They're both issues on which the grassroots, tea party, activist side of the Republican Party doesn't see eye-to-eye with the business community.


School districts that get Impact Act have taken drastic action to deal with the across-the-board federal budget cuts, including eliminating instructional staff and closing schools.


The applicants in the $280 million federal grant competition will be eligible for four-year grants ranging from $37.5 million to $75 million.


University researchers found that poor students fared better in D and F schools than they did in A and B schools, which has implications for No Child Left Behind waivers.


The co-chair of the influential Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation says its strategy on teacher quality won't change, even with a new administration.


The U.S. Secretary of Education tells returning employees, "I know that you're coming back to even more work than you already had on your plate before the Department had to shut down."


The legislation would allow teachers participating in alternative-certification programs to be considered "highly qualified" for an additional two years, through the 2015-16 school year.


A pending deal in Congress would give lawmakers time to find a broader budget solution before another round of sequestration cuts hits agencies in January.


When federal Education Department employees return to work, their lengthy to-do list will include monitoring waivers, judging Race to the Top applications, and pursuing financial sanctions against Georgia.


A Republican proposal would give agencies flexibility to determine how they made sequester cuts. But this is not going over well with education advocates.


The end of the shutdown can't come soon enough for school lunch. It's unclear at this point which states have the cash they'll need to keep feeding students into November.


We're more than a year away from the 2014 mid-term elections, but the National Education Association is already calling out four Republicans, who could have pivotal races next fall, for what the union sees as their role in the current near complete-and-total fiscal meltdown


Remember sequestration, those 5 percent across-the-board cuts to federal programs that went into effect last March? These days, with the debt-ceiling the debate and the shutdown sucking up all of the oxygen in Washington, it seems some in Congress may have pushed them to the backburner.


So far, school districts seem to have been spared the vast majority of the pain, but that doesn't mean folks in the education field don't have questions about the shutdown.


Since leaving the Obama administration, Clinton has turned back to a longheld interest of hers: early-childhood education.


The number of applicants for this year's contest is down, but so is the money up for grabs.


The federal budget impasse was expected to affect up to 19,000 children who are served by the 23 Head Start grantees that receive their federal funding on Oct. 1.


Over the next few days, we'll be compiling a list of Frequently Asked Questions about the government shutdown and answering them on the blog.


With no end in sight to the shutdown, House Republicans are introducing a series of bills funding certain programs that have gotten political attention, including Head Start.


Can't get enough of congressional dysfunction? Are you one of the nearly 4,000 furloughed Education Department employees and have some time on your hands?


Bids for the second round of the round of the competition can't be emailed - they have to be delivered through snail mail.


There's been little impact so far from the government shutdown on K-12 schools around the country, but a handful of public and private school students in the Washington area are an unfortunate exception.


For now, school districts and states still aren't feeling major effects from a short-term, partial shutdown of the federal government.


The U.S. Department of Education and other government agencies are on partial shutdown now that Congress has failed to reach agreement on a temporary spending plan to keep the government open.


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