November 2013 Archives

The U.S. Department of Education also reaffirmed that Oregon and Kansas are still in hot water with their No Child Left Behind Act waivers.


Maryland and North Carolina, both Race to the Top states, are among those that want to delay part of their teacher-evaluation implementation under their No Child Left Behind Act waivers.


The data left out a lot of things that could prove pivotal when trying to make claims about the efficacy of the program.


The Obama administration has continued to think of creative ways to get what it wants without having to ask lawmakers for it, even congressional Democrats.


Two-thirds of schools that entered the federal School Improvement Grant program in its first year have seen gains in student achievement, but another third saw declines or no change.


AASA, the School Superintendents Association, pinpoints the states that lean most heavily on the federal government to fund K-12 education.


The 31 finalists represent 80 school districts across 21 states, including urban and rural districts. Winners, to be announced in December, will split $120 million.


Lawmakers questioned the wisdom of the Obama administration's proposal to create a new high school redesign program using U.S. Department of Labor funds.


Up to 40 grants, ranging from $2 million to $7 million, would be awarded to high schools that better prepare students for college and careers.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan's comments on common core have set off a firestorm of controversy. But it's a point he's made before.


The U.S. Department of Education is refusing to disclose the top-scoring but unfunded Investing in Innovation scale-up application, which scored 77.83, because the score was not "approximately 80."


U.S Secretary of Education Arne Duncan told state chiefs that he's likely to revoke "one, two, or three" No Child Left Behind Act waivers as early as this summer.


For better or for worse, the U.S. Department of Education is making it far simpler for states to get a No Child Left Behind Act waiver extension.


A hearing at the House Education and the Workforce Committee exposed familiar rifts among federal lawmakers over the measure's costs and overall goals.


States seeking extended NCLB flexibility no longer would have to come up with plans to assure that poor and minority students have equal access to effective teachers, Politics K-12 has learned.


Despite bipartisan backing, a pre-K measure that would cost more than $30 billion in federal funds over its first five years faces big hurdles in a Congress consumed with budget cutting.


Education advocates continue to see the next few weeks as a crucial crunch-time when it comes to putting an end to the 5 percent sequestration cuts.


A draft of the legislation that's been widely distributed among education advocates shows that Harkin, and Miller are largely following the president's proposal.


So now that Election Day 2013 is behind us, we can all turn our attention to ... Election Day 2014! After all, it's only a year away.


For the second year, the U.S. Department of Education decided not to award any large "scale-up" grants for the Investing in Innovation contest.


The board that oversees the National Assessment of Educational Progress is refusing to disclose its media policy on who does, and does not, get early access to test data.


Congress can't seem to do anything bipartisan these days, but a forthcoming preschool bill by Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and Rep. Richard Hanna, R-N.Y., will be a key exception.


A rally on Capitol Hill aimed to fire up advocates who have just weeks to make their case against across-the-board budget cuts before a congressional panel makes its own recommendations.


The education secretary noted that diving into the common core doesn't seem to have slowed down student achievement in the eight states that had begun to implement the standards when the test was given.


The panel may examine how the new law has impacted district hiring of part-time employees and substitute teachers.


Election results will mean big change for schools in New York City and Boston, while Virginia might see more money for K-12.


States with waivers from provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act have until Nov. 22 to ask the U.S. Department of Education for more time to tie personnel decisions to student growth.


Florida, Georgia, and Tennessee are the first states to win approval from the U.S. Department of Education for an extra year to finish their Race to the Top work.


Happy Friday! While you dig into the Halloween candy, check out at these good reads.


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