January 2014 Archives

Connecticut, Mississippi, South Dakota, and Vermont got approval to avoid double-testing students, while Kentucky won a one-year delay in teacher-evaluation implementation.


During his 40-year tenure, Rep. Waxman helped pass the Child Health Insurance Program and the Ryan White CARE Act.


The U.S. Department of Labor's new Youth CareerConnect grants, which will range from $2 million to $7 million, will be awarded in the spring.


In a wide-ranging interview with reporters, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and his staff talked about teacher equity, common core, and waivers.


Besides the Sunshine State, Washington insiders surveyed by Whiteboard Advisors are also eyeing governors' races in New York, Texas, and Pennsylvania.


The Iowa Democrat, who is retiring this year, said he will "try" to get a rewrite of the No Child Left Behind Act done before he leaves office.


The president also mounted an indirect defense of the common-core standards and a more spirited, direct defense of his signature Race to the Top program.


President Barack Obama is expected to use his State of the Union speech to make clear he's willing to exert executive power and influence to push his education priorities.


Sens. Lamar Alexander, of Tennessee, and Tim Scott, of South Carolina, are planning legislation to dramatically expand school choice, with federal financial support.


Georgia decided not to pursue an administrative hearing with the U.S. Department of Education and becomes the first state to lose part of its Race to the Top grant because it didn't implement a promised merit-pay plan.


President Barack Obama is expected to talk about income inequality and poverty in his state-of-the-union address on Tuesday.


While South Carolina had relatively minor problems, the U.S. Department of Education found bigger problems with No Child Left Behind Act waiver implementation in Nevada, new reports show.


The letter from 34 state superintendents caps a rising wave of concern that administering student assessments through two big multistage consortia puts student data privacy at risk.


A department spokeswoman would not comment on whether marijuana legalization efforts will change the messaging or policy for its drug prevention programs.


Obama typically uses his annual address to Congress to outline an edu-wish list for the year.


U.S. Department of Education records confirm that Success for All was the highest-rated Investing in Innovation scale-up application again in 2013. And for a second year in a row, it didn't get funded.


Every year, the nation's largest teachers' union gives an A-through-F grade to every member of Congress, taking into account how they vote on key issues.


In his state of the state speech last night, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence offered perhaps his strongest indication yet that he wants the state to drop entirely out of the common core.


The spending bill is the first since Congress temporarily put the brakes on sequestration, the 5 percent, across-the-board cuts to federal programs that went into effect last March.


Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., the top Democrat on the House education committee and a member of Congress for four decades, announced Monday that he will not seek re-election after this term.


After New York is dinged for not putting a list of reward schools online versus sending out a press release, some are wondering if federal officials are monitoring the right things.


There may not be enough new money at lawmakers' disposal to fund both programs at a level that makes the White House happy.


San Antonio, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Southeastern Kentucky, and the Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma are all part of a great big Obama administration interagency collaboration known as the "Promise Zone" initiative.


Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., the House Majority Leader, used a high-profile speech on K-12 to draw attention to what he sees as a concerted effort to tamp down school choice.


A new report by an independent evaluator, calls into question whether SIG schools are really getting assistance that's very different from schools that aren't part of the School Improvement Grant program.


The law hits its dozen year mark during the school year in which it specifies, that technically, all children are supposed to be proficient in reading and math.


How much, if any, money will Congress provide for the administration's biggest new initiative, a plan to help states expand preschool to more four-year-olds?


A new report from the U.S. Department of Education's inspector general chronicles implementation woes in Race to the Top states.


Mississippi and Idaho have some of the biggest problems, according to a new wave of No Child Left Behind Act monitoring reports from the U.S. Department of Education.


The U.S. Secretary of Education, who is said to have voiced an opinion on New York City's top schools job, has gotten involved in local decisions many times before.


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