February 2014 Archives

A recurring theme of the U.S. Department of Education's monitoring reports is the struggle for states to implement the required improvements in its priority and focus schools.


The administration is expected to ask Congress for more money for early-childhood education and just might just get a bit of it.


Leaders in Washington state have floated a bare-bones outline of a first-of-its-kind waiver that may or may not fly with the U.S. Department of Education.


The U.S. Senate is going to take up a bill to revise the Child Care and Development Block Grant program—which hasn't been renewed since 1996—as soon as next week.


President Barack Obama plans to announce a new task force and $200 million in investments from foundations as small steps toward solving large achievement gaps.


Key House Republicans want to know how the U.S. Department of Education plans to pursue a proposed "50-state strategy" that would have states revamp their "highly qualified" teacher plans.


Maryland's latest No Child Left Behind waiver request illustrates how difficult it is to monitor and understand the national accountability landscape.


New guidance from the U.S. Department of Education focuses on making sense of federal laws and implementing best practices to better protect students' data privacy.


The department made it clear that this new competition will be "distinct" from past efforts, and the new money is a wide-open slate.


Kansas, Oklahoma, and South Dakota are the latest to get their grades from the U.S. Department of Education on their No Child Left Behind waiver implementation.


The U.S. Department of Education is allowing Idaho to give only common-core-aligned field tests to students this spring, which means no achievement data will be produced for parents, educators, and the public.


Sen. Murray is trying her best to make the state's case to Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, but it seems to be far from a slam dunk.


Both states asked for too much leeway in implementing their teacher-evaluation systems, so federal officials want to take a closer look.


The nation's largest teachers' union said that states and districts in too many places have "botched" the implementation of the common-core standards.


The U.S. Department of Education grants North Carolina a waiver allowing a one-year delay in tying teacher evaluations to personnel decisions, and it gives seven states waivers so they don't have to double-test students.


The first season of the Netflix political potboiler was rich with education-policy plotlines, and we're hoping for more of the same.


Overall, the new data showed that roughly two-thirds of School Improvement Grant schools improved in reading or math, and another third declined.


The Obama administration's recent school discipline guidance is laudable, but decisions about how to deal with student behavior are best left to local officials, wrote four House Republicans


GOP lawmakers have introduced legislation barring the U.S. Secretary of Education from "coercing" states into adopting the Common Core standards.


The Obama administration's waivers have allowed some states to back off from the core goal of NCLB law—educational equity for poor and minority students


A group of large-district superintendents outline their vision for what a new version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act ought to look like.


While Minnesota's federal monitoring report is nearly flawless, Oregon and Arkansas are struggling to implement the requirements for turning around their lowest-performing schools.


Sixty-two of 92 Investing in Innovation projects awarded in 2010 through 2012 use teacher and principal professional development as a key strategy, the Government Accountability Office found.


Federal early-childhood education programs aren't doing nearly enough to meet a tidal wave of demand at the state level, Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, said at a congressional hearing.


Rep. Phil Gingrey, R-Ga., a former school board member and candidate for Senate, is preparing legislation that would restrict the U.S. Secretary of Education from dangling grant money to entice a state to adopt common core.


President Barack Obama's marquee, multibillion-dollar proposal to entice states to expand their prekindergarten offerings--which was already a political long shot--hit yet another roadblock Wednesday.


There's been some discussion that Kline would need a waiver to remain in his post after this Congress, since some leadership posts are term-limited.


The Virginia Democrat has had an interest in K-12 issues, particularly when it comes to educational equity and juvenile justice.


Jim Shelton, the acting deputy secretary at the U.S. Department of Education, isn't putting his money on a big, bipartisan preschool bill coming out of Congress anytime soon.


At an event Tuesday, President Obama will announce commitments from Verizon, Sprint, AT&T and other companies to provide students and families with free wireless access and other services.


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