March 2014 Archives

The charter school bill is likely to look similar to a bill that passed the House by a huge bipartisan margin of 365-54 back in 2011.


Take a look at the challenges and accomplishments of all 12 winners of the original Race to the Top grant competition in this handy chart.


The U.S. Department of Education is planning to give applicants a leg-up in competitive grant programs if their proposals mesh with the goals of the Obama administration's interdepartmental "Promise Zone" initiative, which is aimed at helping revitalize high-poverty communities.


The federal government asks for a lot of data from schools of education, but some at a U.S. Senate hearing questioned if it helps prospective teachers prepare for the classroom.


The House education committee had lots of praise for a bipartisan U.S. Senate bill on child care, but leaders are skeptical of new spending.


The report says the federal grant competition helped states beef up teacher training and college and career-readiness programs, but contains little hard data and ignores Race to the Top hiccups.


School turnarounds and new policies for school meal programs were among the issues highlighted at urban educators' annual legislative conference in Washington.


Even states that won multimillion Race to the Top grants are having trouble supporting foundering schools.


Negotiations have restarted on the Education Sciences Reform Act, a child-care bill sailed through the Senate, and a bipartisan charter school bill is in the works.


Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House education committee, said recently that he will be pouring new energy into a perennial priority: Bolstering funding for special education.


Overall, states have made great progress in a short amount of time, but there have been bumps in the road, according to a report by the Center for American Progress, a think tank in Washington.


The new U.S. Department of Education civil rights data collection show stark disparities among disadvantaged students in everything from discipline to advanced course-taking.


One month after approving a similar, though more limited, waiver for a district in Kansas, the U.S. Department of Education rejects a testing proposal from a South Carolina district.


In releasing the latest progress reports on the $4 billion Race to the Top contest, the U.S. Secretary of Education says Delaware, Hawaii, North Carolina, and Tennessee lead the pack.


Washington state may provide the U.S. Department of Education with its first test case of the fallout if a state loses its No Child Left Behind Act waiver.


Duncan urged state officials to be patient and to "overcommunicate" with the public during the transition to the new standards and new tests.


Even as most other states struggle with the lowest-performing "priority" and "focus" schools, Washington is one of the few that's meeting expectations in those areas.


The Child Care bill is one of the first bipartisan education measures to clear the chamber recently.


Pre-applications for development grants will be due April 14. More contest rules will be announced by the U.S. Department of Education later this spring.


Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House education committee, and Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., the top Democrat on the panel, are working to combine forces on a bill to bolster charter schools, sources say.


The U.S. Senate is set to consider a bill that would update the Child Care and Development Block Grant program, which hasn't gotten a makeover since 1996.


Does the U.S. Department of Education's rejection of a South Carolina district's testing-waiver request put up a roadblock for testing companies trying to break into the common-core market?


The federal footprint on standardized testing would shrink under a bill set to be introduced by Reps. Chris Gibson, R-N.Y, and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., that has major backing from the largest teachers union.


The nation's largest state has won approval to ditch its state tests in favor of new field tests aligned to the common core, which won't produce any data for student accountability for at least a year, sources say.


A real-deal, honest-to-goodness bipartisan early childhood bill could actually make it past the finish line this year. Are early education advocates dancing in the streets? Well...not quite yet


The president's fiscal year 2015 budget would make room for several new K-12 initiatives, including a new Race to the Top program aimed at equity, as well as funding to help train teachers to use technology.


Sources say a program to be unveiled in the fiscal 2015 budget would include a teacher-equity component, as well as seek to close gaps in areas such as student discipline.


The defeat of a referendum in Delaware's Seaford school district illustrates the challenges in the dozen Race to the Top states as the money starts to run out.


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