May 2014 Archives

A new report from the Government Accountability Office says that sequestration cuts to Title I and Impact Aid forced some districts to reduce specialists, increase class sizes, reduce professional development, and delay technology upgrades.


Lauren Camera, who just wrapped up a Spencer Fellowship at Columbia University, will be joining the blog, and Education Week, starting on Monday.


A federal review of the California districts that won a waiver from mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act shows delays and changes to major strategies for dealing with the lowest-achieving schools.


If it becomes law, the waiver plan would let some schools opt out of heightened nutrition standards next year.


Rep. Todd Rokita, R-Ind., is introducing a bill that aims to increase school-choice programs for military and special needs children.


School systems in Florida are worried that an NCLB waiver-renewal decision will arrive too close to the start of the 2014-15 school year for adequate planning.


The potential sale of 20 million student records by ConnectEDU, an ed-tech company that filed for bankruptcy in April, draws action from the Federal Trade Commission.


Senate panel's amendment includes a plan to provide training for schools to comply with student nutrition standards.


States and school districts would be charged with thinking much more critically about how to help students who have been in special education make the transition into the workforce.


"We can't continue to relegate talent and potential to the sidelines," Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in discussing minority participation in certain classes.


Socioeconomic and racial segregation continues to be a problem 60 years after the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision abolishing "separate but equal schools," three federal lawmakers say.


The proposal would require the waivers for districts that can demonstrate at least six months of net revenue loss from compliance.


San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro has been reportedly tapped by President Barack Obama to be the new U.S. secretary of housing and urban development.


A new $75 million grant program announced by the U.S. Department of Education is designed to help improve college attainment, affordability, and success.


The "Dear Colleague" letter included specific guidance related to admissions, students with disabilities, English-language learners, and discipline.


U.S. Senators Edward Markey and Orrin Hatch released a "discussion draft" of a bill that would overhaul the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA.


The measure has strong backing from the administration, but its political prospects are iffy at best.


The Wyoming Department of Education tells schools that it's too late for a final decision on its pending No Child Left Behind Act waiver application in time for the 2014-15 school year.


Now that the department has reversed course on a key aspect of waiver implementation dealing with teacher quality, some are wondering whether state and the feds have the bandwidth to tackle this difficult policy area.


The U.S. Department of Education made a big change to the piece of No Child Left Behind waiver implementation that has tripped up states the most: teacher evaluation.


Some states would be given extensions based on their progress on two of the three big areas of waiver implementation (standards and assessments and turnarounds).


Charter advocates say the federal charter program, which was last reauthorized along with the rest of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act back in 2001, is way overdue for an update.


The legislation calls for new or improved collection of data, and it would add a new focus on examining the implementation of a particular policy or strategy.


The stakes in keeping close watch on districts could be high for states—so far the department has put states on "high risk" status (meaning that they are in danger of losing a waiver) for problems relating to teacher evaluation.


Samuel Halperin, a longtime leader on education policy and among the architects of landmark federal laws of the 1960s, died May 6 in Washington.


Bipartisan charter school legislation is expected to sail through the U.S. House of Representatives later this week. And now a cadre of bipartisan cadre of senators are slated to introduce their own, nearly identical charter bill.


In a May 6 "dear colleague" letter, the federal education department upheld the rights of schools to use affirmative-action policies despite a Supreme Court ruling in April.


Senators discussed NCLB waivers, early-childhood education, and overall funding with the U.S. Secretary of Education at a hearing about the president's education spending request.


The administration would award $250 million in new early learning money, in two kinds of grants: one to states that already have robust early learning programs, and another to those just getting started.


The big partisan education legislation logjam seems to be breaking, at least a little bit, for more targeted bills


Arizona, Kansas, Oregon, each had until Thursday to submit a proposal to the U.S. Department of Education addressing the agency's concerns with their waivers.


In its request for an extension, CORE is asking the Education Department to give districts an extra year to reach full implementation of the new teacher-evaluation system. That would mean 2016-17, rather than 2015-16.


Indiana, which recently became the first state to ditch the Common Core Standards, has landed itself in hot waiver water with the U.S. Department of Education.


Robert Gordon was credited by some with working to ensure that the unprecedented education aid included in the 2009 stimulus would be accompanied by a new commitment to education redesign.


A White House report released today recommends modernizing the privacy regulatory framework that governs how student data is handled.


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