August 2014 Archives

The U.S. Department of Education approved No Child Left Behind waiver extensions for Indiana and Kansas, but not Oklahoma, which abandoned the common core earlier this summer.


Politics K-12 will join U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan during his annual back-to-school bus tour, highlighting administration initiatives in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee.


Gov. Bobby Jindal, who is on a warpath to repeal the common core and accompanying tests in Louisiana, plans to sue the U.S. Department of Education and Education Secretary Arne Duncan for forcing states to adopt the them.


The Republican businessman challenging Democratic U.S. Sen. Al Franken in Minnesota's Senate race is making education the foundation of his campaign.


Washington state lost its waiver because it lacks a law tying student test scores to teacher evaluations, but now federal officials are delaying that requirement for waiver states that need more time.


A Government Accountability Office report found that the federal program that ensures homeless students have access to the public education system is hampered by limited staff and resources, lack of coordination, and more.


Michigan and Ohio will get to keep their NCLB waivers for another year, joining a growing group of states granted an extension while making changes to teacher evaluations.


States that have NCLB Act waivers are being given a chance to delay until the 2015-16 school year the use of student test results in making teacher evaluations.


The 46th annual education policy public opinion poll from PDK/Gallup shows that a majority of Americans oppose the Common Core State Standards.


Florida is unlikely to change a new state law on testing English language learners, despite objections from the U.S. Department of Education that it conflicts with the state's No Child Left Behind waiver requirements.


The former Vermont senator and congressman, a Republican-turned-Independent, was a central player on landmark laws including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the No Child Left Behind Act.


The U.S. Department of Education's assistant secretary for K-12 addresses the promise and pitfalls of the No Child Left Behind Act waivers.


Are teachers ready for Common Core? What happens to the "reform" movement without Michelle Rhee heading up StudentsFirst? Dig into these questions in the Friday Reading List.


Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi North Carolina and Wisconsin will get to keep their NCLB waivers for another year, but two of the extensions come with some pretty big asterisks.


Educators from Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., pen an open letter to members of Congress, urging them to support a bipartisan bill on firearms background checks.


The latest survey of education experts by Whiteboard Advisors reveals little confidence in the ability of Congress to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


The $250 million Preschool Development program represents a relatively modest down payment on the Obama administration's much broader, $75 billion early childhood proposal.


In her bid to unseat Wisconsin's Republican Gov. Scott Walker, what positions is Democrat Mary Burke taking on key K-12 issues?


Alexander and Kline are curious about the reasoning behind the department's seemingly schizophrenic approach to the teacher evaluation portion of the waivers


Senate Republicans are concerned about the U.S. Department of Education's authority to change evaluation criteria for state special education systems.


The Obama administration's signature i3 program, which helped districts scale up promising practices, was supposed to be all about helping pinpoint evidence-based strategies to improve achievement.


If the Beehive State had voluntarily ditched its waiver, it would have been the first state in the nation to do so.


U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., handily beat out tea party challenger, state Rep. Joe Carr, in Thursday's primary.


August is a great time to take a deep dive into Head Start, extended learning time, and peer-reviewed assessments.


As the electronic cigarette trend reaches an increasing number of youths, Senate Democrats want the FDA to take additional steps to regulate the industry's marketing tactics.


Congress left town for its August recess last week without filling a number of key positions at the U.S. Department of Education. That means some folks are stuck with "acting" at the start of their title, and other positions are just plain vacant.


The stance by U.S. Sen. David Vitter puts him at odds with current Gov. Bobby Jindal, a fellow Republican battling to repeal the Common Core State Standards in Louisiana.


A look at how the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association are donating to House and Senate campaigns.


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