October 2014 Archives

For insights on the education implications of the 2014 mid-term elections, check out Education Week's election guide, available online and in PDF form.


Some states are trying out ACT and SAT in their accountability systems, but there are limits to this approach.


Big suburban superintendents want new kinds of tests and the option to test less frequently.


A coalition of groups calls for a rethinking of school accountability, releasing a document long on vision but short on details.


None of the low-performing schools participating in an IES survey took all the steps they were encouraged to take.


Federal and state accountability must do more than just hold schools' feet to the fire on student outcomes, civil rights groups say in a letter to President Barack Obama.


Tennessee recently delayed the use of its new common-core aligned state tests, and Gov. Bill Haslam announced that the state will begin a public vetting of the standards.


A new grant competition from the U.S. Department of Education will help states get early education programs off the ground and give others the chance to expand already successful models.


The president's new thinking on tests seems to put his Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, in a pretty awkward position.


Civil rights and advocacy groups want the U.S. Department of Education to hold states renewing their No Child Left Behind Act waivers accountable for low-income students, minorities, English-language learners, and students with disabilities.


New Hampshire wants to cut the frequency of state-wide summative tests in a handful of districts, in favor of performance-based tests.


Delayed teacher preparation regulations from the U.S. Department of Education are supposed to hold federal teacher-preparation programs more accountable.


The notion that teachers' unions only give to Democrats and education advocacy organizations only give to Republicans is wrong.


The Sooner State stands a very good chance of getting its waiver back. It's just a question of when.


Here's Part II of a run-down of the U.S. Senate races that will decide which party controls the chamber during the 114th Congress.


Scott sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, requesting a hearing on the issue before the Office of the Administrative Law Judges.


Now that Oklahoma's institutions of higher education have given its standards the OK, the Sooner State has suddenly found itself in a position to regain NCLB flexibility.


State tests would be less frequent and assessments would incorporate a lot of performance tasks, in an imaginary 51st state.


State school chiefs and urban district leaders committed to eliminating redundant tests, but they also made clear that they will not back away from annual standardized testing.


Back in August, Oklahoma became the second state to lose its waiver from the No Child Left Behind Act, and accountability in that state has been unsettled ever since.


The National Education Association's political action committee spent $8.3 million since July, including $900,000 to the Democratic Governors Association.


No matter which party comes out ahead on Election Day, the Senate's Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee will have a new leader.


The top Democrat on the House Education Committee, an architect of the No Child Left Behind Act, will share his thoughts Nov. 12 on where federal education policy has been and where it needs to go next.


Florida officials are reportedly planning to take legal action against the department this week in a clash over the question of when the performance of ELLs should factor into the state's accountability system.


Here's a run-down of the U.S. Senate races that will decide which party controls the chamber during the 114th Congress.


The newest poll shows incumbent Sen. Mark Begich down six points against Republican challenger Dan Sullivan in Alaska's U.S Senate race.


Massachusetts faces no consequences from its decision to let districts choose which test to give next spring, but when Colorado explored the possibility of doing the same, the U.S. Department of Education gave it no opening.


Six additional states have now seen their No Child Left Behind waivers extended through the end of this school year, including Arizona, Massachusetts, Missouri, Oregon, Rhode Island and Utah.


The Obama administration's plan for revamping the School Improvement Grant program doesn't give states and districts enough flexibility in coming up with ways to turn around low-performing schools, advocates say.


Education Trust looked at A-through-F-type school grading systems in three states and found that such ratings are "not a powerful signal of the performance of every individual group of kids."


With his comments against the Common Core State Standards, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., looks more and more like a presidential candidate.


As much as 30 percent of school vouchers go unused from the District of Columbia's Opportunity Scholarships Program, which has been at the heart of federal fiscal battles.


Many of the folks originally in charge of major initiatives, including Race to the Top, NCLB waivers, and School Improvement Grants, have left the building.


There are a lot of moving boxes at the U.S. Department of Education, which just opened its new Office of State Support.


The administration last week released an NCLB snap shot of sorts, looking at where states were during the 2011-12 school year.


Should we test students less often? Who is making money off of Common Core tests? What should states have to do to renew their waivers? For the answers, check out these good reads.


Jim Shelton, No. 2 at the Education Department, prepares to step down from his post.


The U.S. Department of Education is giving twelve districts, states, organizations, or post-secondary institutions $20 million total to develop turnaround leaders.


Duncan is putting school districts and states on notice that OCR can investigate those that aren't doing enough to ensure equal access on everything from high-quality facilities to Advanced Placement courses.


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