November 2014 Archives

Happy almost Thanksgiving! Enjoy these goodreads on teachers, staff changes at the Education Department, and old school computer games.


Florida, Kentucky, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia have been tapped to renew their waivers through an expedited process, the department said Tuesday.


The Sooner State was the second state to lose its NCLB waiver after Washington state, and now is the first state to reclaim a lost NCLB waiver.


Secretary Duncan hails the role NAEP played in leading states to work together on new tests.


States are welcome not to adopt the standards, he said, but if they don't, they should aim even higher.


Scott may be more skeptical of test-based accountability than his predecessor, Rep. George Miller, D-Calif, an original author of the NCLB law.


In the wake of Congress's inability to update the country's immigration laws, the president plans to provide legal status to millions of undocumented immigrants living in the United States.


The slate of federal grant programs that help low-income and first-generation students gain access to college are supposed to get funded on a competitive basis, but it doesn't really work that way.


As chairman of the Education and the Workforce Committee during the 114th Congress, Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., is planning to prioritize updating the No Child Left Behind law and the Higher Education Act.


At least one state that never sought the flexibility from NCLB's mandates is contemplating getting in on the waiver action: Nebraska.


After nearly four decades in Congress, Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, chairman of the education panel, begins his farewells and lauds the committee's soon-to-be next chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.


The Child Care and Development Block grant program, which hasn't been updated since 1996, helps low-income families pay for child care.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan would like to see annual state assessments remain at the core of any reauthorization of NCLB, said state chiefs who participated in a Q-and-A in San Diego.


The U.S. Department of Education continues its trend of extending states' No Child Left Behind Act waivers even if they haven't completely taken care of everything cited in their monitoring reports.


Schools overseen by the Bureau of Indian Education have serious financial problems that includes the accumulation of unspent funds intended for instructional purposes such as special education, the report says.


States seeking to keep their NCLB law waivers will have to do more to show how they plan to identify and intervene in low-performing schools, but won't have to give data showing their new systems are improving student achievement, new U.S. Department of Education guidance says.


Ahead of the U.S. Department of Education's No Child Left Behind waiver guidance, expected this week, Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and Democrats who represent majority-minority districts are urging Education Secretary Arne Duncan to ensure the academic achievement of all students.


The child care development block grant could be on the president's desk by the end of next week.


Twenty-seven pages of new guidance released on the issue Monday appear to give states a lot of running room to figure out just what these equity plans should look like.


For those keeping score at home, this leaves just New Mexico and Louisiana waiting on their extensions.


Now that Republicans have taken control of both chambers of Congress, this could very well be the last year of the Investing in Innovation program.


Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senate Minority Leader plan to consider legislation on charter schools or school vouchers in the 114th Congress.


Keep on top of the outcome in pivotal U.S. Senate races as the ballot results roll in Nov. 4 and throughout the following day.


In the country's most expensive contest, Republican challenger Thom Tillis ousted Democratic incumbent U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan.


With a Republican wave in the midterm elections, conservatives clinch control over the U.S. Senate.


Teachers' unions spent big this midterm election cycle, especially on state and local races, without much return on that investment.


The American Federation of Teachers launched several political ads leading up to Tuesday's midterm election, and AFT President Randi Weingarten stumped in key states.


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