November 2018 Archives

A little-known provision of the Every Student Succeeds Act allows students who attend a "persistently dangerous school," or who become the victim of a violent crime on school grounds, to transfer to a safer school.


The U.S. Department of Education's internal watchdog—the Office of the Inspector General—will be looking at the agency's process dismissing civil rights complaints, its oversight of accountability systems, and other issues.


DeVos said that the country's higher education system is in "crisis" thanks in part to a "government takeover of the student lending system" under the Obama administration. That claim met with strong criticism.


At least five states want to gauge school performance in part on access to arts education.


Federal lawmakers had a big menu of issues to tackle, like DACA, student-data privacy, and higher education, during this Congress. But the list of accomplishments may fall short of what many sought or expected.


Pastorek, who helped lead the overhaul of New Orleans' schools after Hurricane Katrina, will help the island with everything from ESSA to philanthropic support as its schools recover from Hurricane Maria.


The office for civil rights is reversing itself on several key changes in the manual that outlines how it investigates civil rights claims.


State chiefs who want to make changes to the ESSA plans must first consult with their governors, and give the education community an opportunity to comment.


While most of the debate over Title IX, the federal law that prohibits sexual discrimination in education, has centered on colleges and universities, the new civil rights guidance will affect K-12 schools, too.


A study of 17 states finds shortcomings in their school turnaround approaches and says it can be hard to tell how states will sustain their school improvement efforts.


The Every Student Succeeds Act requires states to publish a host of new information, including data on school-by-school spending, long-term English-learners, homeless and foster students, and more.


Restraint and seclusion is controversial in the special education community; one in 100 students with special needs was restrained or secluded in the 2013-14 school year, according to federal data.


The 2020 presidential election is right around the corner. And there's a good chance that education could be a higher-profile-than-usual issue in what's shaping up to be a large and unwieldy field of potential candidates.


DeVos and her team have created a guide to help parents make better sense of the maze of data that states are required to put in their new report cards under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The former Republican senator from Alabama had clashed repeatedly with the civil rights community over transgender students, affirmative action, immigration, and more.


With newly empowered Democrats in charge of the House education committee, expect the education secretary to testify more on Capitol Hill as she and other Trump education officials go under the microscope.


Republicans will breathe a sigh of relief if they keep the House, but it may not mean big changes for education policy, given the lack of momentum over the past years on issues like data privacy and DACA.


Which state races should you be paying attention to? What about congressional races? And what will the outcome of the election mean for the Every Student Succeeds Act and U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos?


An Education Week analysis of the education secretary's calendar shows she met far more often with GOP federal and state policymakers than Democrats in her 18 months.


The impact of the killings of students and staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School could extend into the tight Florida contest that will help decide control of the U.S. Senate.


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