April 2019 Archives

A draft bill released by House Democrats seeks notable increases for educators' professional development, English-language learner programs, social-emotional learning, and more.


For some time, Washington observers have thought Democrats and Trump might team up to push through an infrastructure spending bill. But so far, it hasn't materialized.


Last month, House Democrats blasted President Donald Trump's proposal to cut 10 percent from the Education Department's budget and eliminate more than two dozen programs. Now its their turn with the budget.


A Beltway think tank's report indicates while some state education leaders feel they are getting a handle on school improvement and evidence under the Every Student Succeeds Act, many worries persist.


As a U.S. senator and vice president, Biden focused on preschool, gun-free school zones, and the Obama administration's response to the Newtown, Conn. school shooting in 2012.


Rural communities with major connectivity issues: Looking to upgrade your broadband? The U.S. Department of Agriculture may have a grant and loan program for you.


Presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., reiterated her change of heart on a controversial issue: whether pizza sauce should count as a vegetable in school lunches.


Moulton gave a shout-out to teachers "marching for fair pay" and kids "fighting for safe schools" in a video announcing his campaign for the presidency.


The U.S. Department of Education held a day-long on the issue, a Trump administration priority since the passage of bipartisan prison reform legislation last year.


Federal Title I aid to districts for disadvantaged students has grown under the Trump administration, but not all states are benefiting equally from the growth, or seeing more money at all.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos on Wednesday visited a Kentucky high school that is recovering from a 2018 shooting to award additional grant money meant to aid its recovery efforts.


Education leaders in Puerto Rico say ensuring students are prepared for jobs on the island is key to the U.S. territory's long-term future. But will its efforts be enough to make young people stay?


The Indiana mayor's remarks highlight how Democrats seeking the White House are particularly concerned with getting teachers on their side after waves of strikes and protests.


Supporters for curtailing racial and socioeconomic segregation in American public schools say the federal government should take an active role in funding, oversight, and in other areas.


A marathon hearing Wednesday marked the first time U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos appeared before the House education committee since Democrats won the House last November.


The National Urban League says eight states are doing a "poor" job looking out for vulnerable students under their ESSA plans, while many others are doing "sufficient" work.


The replacement of one interim education secretary with another highlights ongoing uncertainty about the U.S. territory's public schools, which educate more than 300,000 students.


The state hasn't followed the Every Students Succeeds Act's rules for testing its students and could lose funding as a result, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' team said in a letter to the Arizona officials.


Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., an architect of the Every Student Succeeds Act, said Tuesday that he worries some state plans don't do enough for vulnerable groups of students.


Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., wants to see school safety emerge as a top issue in the 2020 Democratic primary as he joins a crowded field of candidates.


In a speech to chief state school officers, the education secretary encouraged states to take advantage of flexibilities in the Every Student Succeeds Act and find ways to elevate the teaching profession.


The proposal for a system of tax credits to bolster educational choice is the latest pitch from the president and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to move the needle on their favorite K-12 policy.


Last time DeVos addressed the chiefs with some "tough love," telling them their ESSA plans were more than a little lacking even though they technically met the letter of the law.


Days after stepping down as the U.S. territory's education secretary and transitioning to a role as a paid adviser at the island's education department, Keleher said she was leaving that new role.


Closing the border would be "a major problem" for thousands of children who are U.S. citizens but live in Mexico, and attend school in the United States, one advocate says.


Ryan, an Ohio Democrat who was first elected to the House in 2002, says ESSA can help states close achievement gaps, and that there should be more accountability for charter schools.


The Every Student Succeeds Act turned three years old in December, but only recently have many districts and schools begun to experience are experiencing the law's impact.


Julia Keleher is leaving her position as Puerto Rico's top K-12 official, but will serve as an adviser at the island's education department to help with the leadership transition and ongoing policy changes.


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