May 2019 Archives

Despite the strong economy, many states still haven't caught up to pre-recession spending levels, according to a new report.


Longtime Politics K-12 blogger Alyson Klein moves on to Education Week's coverage of technology and the future of work as Politics K-12 continues with its trademark mix of politics and policy.


The Democratic presidential candidate and former vice president unveiled a broad K-12 education plan Tuesday that calls for tripling Title I funding, grants to boost school integration efforts, and increasing student supports.


Arts education is an often-neglected but frequently critical component of what schools can provide to students, and there's a diverse set of approaches to how states and school systems approach the subject in schools of choice.


Teacher diversity involves action at a variety of levels, but a broad swath say the federal government should be a key partner on the issue when it comes to legislation and regulation.


DeVos' request that the California school not notify the community of her visit beforehand underscores the negative reactions she can still attract in public settings, as well as competing concerns for school leaders.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos sent and received a "limited number" of emails related to official government business from her personal accounts, a review found.


A Center on Education Policy report reveals the share of schools getting identified as needing improvement varies widely by state, with one labeling 69 percent of its schools this way for ESSA purposes.


It's appropriations season on Capitol Hill, and House Democrats want to spend billions more on schools. But that doesn't mean all the golden oldies are on the way back into spending bills.


Bernie Sanders' sweeping vision would establish a $60,000 minimum salary for teachers, while clamping down on charters and boosting efforts to desegregate schools. It's hard to see a lot of it becoming a reality.


Supporters of the bill say it would extend critical civil rights protections to more students. But opponents say it ignores parents' rights in schools and could lead to confusing situations for some children.


"We need meaningful solutions to dismantle racial and socioeconomic segregation in America's schools," said Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, the author of one of the two bills addressing integration and diversity. Do advocates think her ideas go far enough?


The New York City mayor has pushed universal pre-K, championed a controversial school turnaound program, and picked a schools chief backing a divisive effort to diversify selective high schools.


The evaluation of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program revealed several mixed outcomes from the only federally funded private school voucher program in the nation.


Mont. Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat who's served as the Big Sky Country's governor since 2013, has also supported the teaching of Native American languages and better internet for his state's schools.


"Let's get a person with real teaching experience," said Warren, who also used the Monday announcement to continue her attacks on Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.


Julián Castro is making a big bet that a bold vision for education can lift his numbers in the 2020 presidential polls.


ESSA doesn't really have the teeth to force a state to follow through on its federal accountability plan, if the state doesn't care about losing key federal funding.


House Democrats are using an education spending bill to address concerns about arming teachers directing Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to issue guidance on the issue. Could they have gone further?


A spending bill that would provide nearly $76 billion to the U.S. Department of Education was approved by a key House committee on Wednesday.


Watch the video or read the transcript from U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' remarks at the Education Writers Association conference on May 6 in Baltimore.


The right-leaning Heritage Foundation, which supports school choice, worries Betsy DeVos' plan could give the federal government too much influence. One of her top staffers said that concern is overblown.


Charter schools would take a nearly 10 percent cut in the House appropriations bill, a sign that disdain for charter schools has grown as a political force among Democrats.


In March, the California senator and Democratic presidential candidate released a teacher pay proposal. She sought to build her support among educators at a May 6 American Federation of Teachers town hall.


In a Q&A at the Education Writers Association, the education secretary also talked about her school choice initiative and civil rights record.


Candidates that want the National Education Association's seal of approval will have to submit to a video interview and fill out a detailed questionnaire on their views.


Bennet has a long record in education policy. He kicked off his career as Denver schools chief and put his stamp on the Every Student Succeeds Act.


We now have two pretty different visions, one from Donald Trump and one from House Democrats, for what federal education spending should look like for fiscal 2020.


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