One of education's biggest philanthropists has a message for governors, which he's delivering right about now at the National Governors Association winter meeting in Washington. Do raise class size, Bill Gates is expected to tell the governors. Continue to research effective technologies that will reach more students. Don't impose furloughs or temporarily eliminate school days to save money. And don't keep paying teachers based on longevity and advanced degrees. We'll have more on Gates' speech at edweek.org later, but until then, he offered a preview in this Washington Post opinion piece. [UPDATE (March 1): Read about Gates' speech, and ...


Schools have until March 11 to apply for the Race to the Top Commencement Challenge. The reward? A graduation speech delivered by President Obama.


The latest proposal would keep things afloat for two weeks and give lawmakers a chance to continue negotiations on a bill to finance the government for the rest of fiscal year 2011.


While a shutdown probably would not be a picnic for anyone, if the past is any guide, most school districts and states wouldn't feel an immediate pinch.


The transformation model, often viewed as the least restrictive turnaround model under the federal program, again proves most popular, surveys by the Center on Education Policy show.


The assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education has been approached about several outside positions, the Education Department confirms.


Pressure mounts on the U.S. Senate to reject current-year cuts to programs such as Head Start, Title I, and School Improvement Grants approved by the House of Representatives in the bill passed last weekend.


Join me and the Hechinger Institute's Richard Lee Colvin at 2 p.m. today as we discuss the effects of the economic-stimulus package, as detailed in a special project that involved education reporters from across the nation. We'll take your questions, so please, submit yours now....


The U.S. Department of Education would see its budget slashed by more than $5 billion under the temporary spending bill approved early this morning, which now faces a showdown in the Senate as a March 4 final passage deadline looms.


The commission will recommend ways that federal policy could address funding disparities.


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