December 2014 Archives

Early Years readers were interested in a variety of different topics over the past year.


Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which provides services to infants and toddlers, has remained mostly level-funded while other programs for young children grown.


School leaders can link community partners, as well as work within their own buildings to improve K-3 education, according to a recent article in The Kappan.


States are paying for preschool programs in most of the rest of the country. But as of 2014, eight states remain holdouts to the general trend.


Some of the 10 states that had no public preschool program when the National Institute for Early Education Research last issued a report in 2013 have made moves to change that.


The early education news for the last week has been all about the money: who got it, who didn't, and whether or not anyone should have gotten it.


The campaign encourages members of Univision's mostly Hispanic audience to talk, read, and sing with their infants and toddlers.


Where do things stand now in terms of how many states have required reading assessments, interventions, and retention?


The White House Summit on Early Education included announcements of new federal funding and private donations to support early learning.


The announcement of federal funding comes on the day of a White House "summit" on early education that brings together public and private partners.


The research connected birth and school records to 1.6 million children born in Florida over a 10-year timespan.


Thanks to a scholarship program funded by the state's First Things First tobacco tax, twice as many early education teachers in Pima County, Ariz., hold college degrees now than did five years ago,


The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program is set to expire in March if Congress does not take action.


Nearly two thirds of California voters consider preschool "very important," according to a new Field Poll, conducted in partnership with the California education news outlet EdSource.


The extra time will allow towns time to adjust their budgets for the new mandate, state education officials said.


Plans call for a new assessment, known as a "kindergarten-entry profile," to be introduced statewide in 2017.


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