Instructional leadership is easy to do but hard to put into action. There are at least five reasons why those who say they are instructional leaders may not be practicing what they preach.


We talk a lot about what teachers need, but often our words and our actions do not match up. Here's how to change that.


We ask each of our students to be works in progress, and to be confident enough to believe that they can achieve and perform at truly high levels. They deserve educators who are committed to doing the same, argues Paul Freeman.


Most examples of deep learning aren't going deep enough nor are they widespread enough, says guest blogger Michael Fullan.


Humans are not intrinsically good. Each of us is conflicted; sometimes selfish, other times committing to others and the common good. Guest blogger Michael Fullan believes that we are tipped to be good but only when certain conditions prevail.


Collective teacher efficacy happens when a group of teachers come together, co-construct a goal, learn how to implement it, and that goal has a positive impact on student learning. Can't leaders have a similar impact through collective leader efficacy?


So often, we look at coaching as a one-on-one relationship, but coaching administrative teams can have a powerful impact as well.


If you want to engage with other educators, and debating is not your thing, try these suggestions from guest blogger Jennifer Borgioli Binis, an online debater.


My girlfriend and I saved for years and then went on a nine-month adventure visiting countries we always dreamed about seeing, says guest blogger Charly Boerboom. However, one unexpected stop on our trip turned into a lifelong passion.


In articles and presentations on student feedback, educators are admonished today to use "No grades, comments only!" Unfortunately, they do not seem to know the whole story, nor do they seem to know what the research really says, guest blogger Thomas R. Guskey, a senior research scholar at the University of Louisville.


The opinions expressed in Peter DeWitt's Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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