In his budget proposal, President Barack Obama pitches new money for mental health initiatives, school security, improvements to school climate, and school kitchens.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there are about 535,000 children ages 1 to 5 nationwide who have elevated blood levels, which can have an effect on academic achievement.


U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack successfully lobbied Congress to preserve money for meat inspecting by letting him cut money from a program to upgrade school kitchens.


Researchers found that a smaller share of students who received free or reduced-price lunches that had to meet higher nutritional standards were overweight than among students who did not eat school lunches.


The authors cite a statistic they label "most disturbing": Some 36 percent of all black male students with disabilities were suspended out of school during the 2009-10 school year.


Researchers who analyzed the NRA school safety proposal say it's expensive to implement, could increase the potential for injuries, and fails to get at the roots of the school violence.


In part driven by a federal grant program, more states are measuring schools' nonacademic attributes, including school climate and students' health.


Parents and community groups join forces in Providence, R.I., to reduce chronic absenteeism; 32 percent of students missed at least a month of school in 2011.


Having two babies so young makes it difficult for young women to attend school, get jobs, and deliver healthy babies.


In an Education Week chat earlier today, author Kelley King discussed how schools can address the gender gap in both achievement and discipline.


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