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Ensuring Holidays Don't Turn Into Work Days For Your Team

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As a startup founder, you'll only work on days of the week that end in y.

Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday. Saturday. Sunday.

MenurkeyThe fourth day of this work week is a day called Thanksgiving. In fact, it's a special version called Thankgivingukah. Even though some might argue that "holiday" fits the "y" rule, I'll be taking that day off.

And while I joke about days I choose to work, I do truly view it as a choice.

But it's different when you have a team. You have to create an environment that respects their need to have personal-professional alignment.

This is why we decided to make Friday a company holiday. Now before you raise an eyebrow at your assumption that Friday would be a day off, I will remind you that Black Friday is not an actual holiday.

Making this decision actively was something we had to realize we needed to do. Thankfully, our decision-making process involved only a two-line chat between myself and my co-founder.

And then I sent out an official sounding email that (hopefully) our non-existent Human Relations department would approve of:

Subject: Thanksgiving

Please enjoy next Thursday and Friday off as holiday days with family, friends, or the people of cities like Los Angeles.

(Someone on our team is planning to visit Los Angeles for the holiday.)

Image credit: Thanksgivingukkah Boston

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