August 2011 Archives

In the next week or so, like every year at this time, thousands of new teachers will sprint into schools, ready--or so they think--to change the world by teaching and inspiring kids to do great things. Thousands of veteran teachers, meanwhile, will saunter into those same schools, glancing at their new colleagues and thinking, "just wait." It's not that veteran teachers relish the thought of idealistic rookies having rude awakenings. It's just that many of us experienced them ourselves. But those who've survived their early years and thrived in later years know that teaching in general--and each school year in ...


At an orientation before my first year of teaching, one of the speakers referred to an article titled, Phases of First-Year Teaching, in which Ellen Moir identifies several phases first-year teachers typically go through. And, according to Moir, they go through them in the same order at roughly the same times, as depicted in the following graph: What jumped out to me when I first saw this--as it has to pre-service teachers I've shared this with--is how early and abruptly new teachers feel disillusioned. Just six weeks or so after entering their classrooms with high hopes, they're questioning whether they've ...


The transition to any new job can be tough, but especially a job as isolating as teaching can be. That's why it's great when schools assign veteran teachers to serve as mentors for new teachers. It's also great that so many veteran teachers are willing to be mentors--often with little or no additional pay. At the same time, I've noticed that an assigned mentor is rarely able to meet all of a mentee's needs. This isn't a reflection on the mentor, but rather a limitation of mentor-mentee relationships in general and in the context of teaching in particular. Worst-case scenario, ...


Advertisement

Most Viewed On Teacher

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments