Recently in civil rights Category

<<   <   1   2   3   4   5   >   >>  

August 26, 2013

Civil Rights Leaders Condemn Privatization of Prisons and Schools

Despite research showing that closing public schools does not improve test scores or graduation rates, the federal agenda has incentivized the privatization of schools with primary fall out on low-income communities of color.

August 15, 2013

John Thompson: Can Education Trust Be Trusted by Teachers?

The Education Trust, like too many school "reformers," believes that output-drive accountability is the answer to educational inequities.

July 14, 2013

Trayvon Martin Verdict Renews Trauma for Students

The verdict in the Trayvon Martin case will unfortunately reinforce the trauma that his death caused for people around the country

June 17, 2013

John Thompson: Let's Look Before Leaping to Ban Suspensions

Perhaps this is naïve, but isn't it time to stop issuing one risky mandate after another on schools that are already overburdened?

May 13, 2013

Monty Neill: Building a Successful Test Reform Movement

Over the past few months, I've been involved in dialogues and public meetings aimed at furthering the testing reform movement. Our conversations focused on how to win key goals: less testing, lower stakes, and better assessment practices. In this post, I focus on basic goals and strategy for launching a campaign. In subsequent posts, I will discuss the importance of pushing for high-quality assessments, and then propose tactics to educate the public, develop strong coalitions, and persuade policymakers.

May 04, 2013

Rebirth: New Orleans -- Documentary Poses a Moral Dilemma

this highlights for me, the moral dimension that Merrow ignores, when, at the end of the film, he proclaims this experiment a success. How can we accept that a third of the schools in New Orleans have been consigned to the status of dumping grounds for the other two thirds? How can we celebrate the creation of a system that allows schools to wall themselves off from students who are the most damaged by poverty and violence - and relegates those students to schools that cannot possibly succeed in this competitive scheme?

March 28, 2013

John Thompson: Garland and Carr Remind Us of the Perils of Segregation

At the end of their balanced histories, Carr and Garland voice concerns about our increasingly segregated schools, and the willingness of policy wonks to impose their theories on poor children of color. Garland concludes that "desegregation should have been a two-way street." She is frustrated that desegregation was dismantled without "salvaging its undeniable benefits." Contemporary reformers have ignored its lessons. They also focus on "tearing out dysfunction and blight, instead of finding existing strengths and building on what people value." Garland, explains, "Once again, ... those in power are treating black schools as they did black neighborhoods during urban renewal - with an imperious sense of what is good for the community, regardless of what the people there want."

March 24, 2013

Jack Hassard: School Closings in Our Cities: A Deep Ecological Problem

As Deming (1994a) points out, beware of common sense when we think about such issues as ranking children by grades, ranking schools and teachers by test scores, and rewards and punishments. Deming believes that grades should be abolished, and that the ranking of people and schools should not occur. And significant to the issue of school closure, Deming suggests that taking action (such as closing a school today) may produce more problems in the future, and that a better remedy would be investigate why children in poor neighborhoods are not doing well on state mandated tests, and then do something about it.

March 08, 2013

Chicago Students Boycott the NAEP to Demand Safety

So we acted. We talked to other seniors and got them to wear black and taught them about how they didn't have to take the test. We told them that this wasn't a service learning opportunity, and that the NAEP scores might be used against schools like ours. We talked through texting and social media. On the day of the test, we were called out of class to attend the test. Some of my classmates refused to come. We went to the location and we told the test proctor that we didn't want to take the test and asked if we could return to our regular classes.

March 02, 2013

Georgia Religious Schools Skirt Constitution to Access Taxpayer Funds

To be clear, what is happening here is that individual taxpayers can direct the funds that are being diverted from the state tax coffers towards their own children's tuition, or that of their friends. Vouchers have proven to be highly unpopular with voters, as they divert scarce funds from public schools and unconstitutionally allow them to pay for religious instruction. This violates the state constitution's prohibition against tax moneys being spent "directly, or indirectly" on religious organizations. This law is an end run around the Constitutions of the State of Georgia, and the United States, and if Earl Ehrhart has his way, this week the state will toss another $30 million into the pot.

<<   <   1   2   3   4   5   >   >>  

Advertisement

Most Viewed On Teacher

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments

  • Jackie Conrad: National standards will result in making teachers as dishonest as read more
  • Marsha Ratzel: I couldn't agree with Anthony any more about that national read more
  • Anthony Cody: Leslie, Thank you for stating so eloquently the reason so read more
  • Leslie S. Leff: Dear President Obama, I became an elementary teacher over 20 read more
  • marc: Well, since you're asking for my professional opinion, first I read more