September 2012 Archives

A recent feature on CNN.com explores student favoritism in the classroom from the perspectives of a student, teacher, and child expert.


Middle and high school science teachers might want to take note of a free virtual journey being offered to classrooms this week and next.


There are many theories on why Finland's students perform so well on international academic comparisons—one of the most compelling being that it's because teaching is a well-respected and coveted profession there. In a recent blog post, Esther Quintero, a research associate at the Shanker Institute, adds a new wrinkle to this hypothesis. She argues that Finnish respect for teachers might be explained by gender equity in the country. She says that, by contrast, teachers in the United States—traditionally and predominantly female—are treated as inferiors. "Compliance is rewarded; independence and autonomy are not teacher-like," she notes. Quintero...


Students in North Carolina will now have to think twice before posting disparaging comments about their teachers on social media sites.


The U.S. needs many more public high schools that "focus exclusively on high-ability, highly motivated students," posits Chester E. Finn Jr., the president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, in a recent New York Times op-ed.


Diane Ravitch argues that, regardless of the exact details of the contract, the teachers came out victorious in the Chicago strike simply by displaying their strength.


An interesting NPR story excavates some psychological research from the 1960s showing that teachers' expectations for students can have a profound effect on their intellectual development. Why? In a nutshell, because teachers interact differently with the kids they expect to do better: As [Harvard Professor Robert] Rosenthal did more research, he found that expectations affect teachers' moment-to-moment interactions with the children they teach in a thousand almost invisible ways. Teachers give the students that they expect to succeed more time to answer questions, more specific feedback, and more approval: They consistently touch, nod and smile at those kids more. The ...


As a result of a $2.8 million "budget error," the Nampa School District in Idaho will soon run out of money for substitute teachers, reports the Idaho Press-Tribune. The solution? Rely on volunteers to do the job.


The showdown in the nation's third-largest school system holds implications for the national school reform agenda and carries political reverberations as well.


Commentators flesh out issues and take sides in the Chicago teachers' strike.


The Newseum in Washington has just launched Decision 2012: Exploring Elections and the Media, an online resource for teaching about the presidential campaign and election.


Responding to a cheating scandal at Harvard, renowned developmental psychologist Howard Gardner worries that elite students' relentless drive for success, fueled by what he refers to as "market ways of thinking," has crippled their moral sense


A new research study out of the University of California, Los Angeles, reports the "somewhat surprising" finding that spending extra time studying tends to negatively affect high school students' academic performance in school the next day. But there's also a perfectly logical explanation for this: When students study more, the researchers found, they tend to sleep less.


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