The older we get, the harder it is to make change. Think about the adage, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks." It is ingrained in us that change becomes almost impossible as we age, but that is simply not true.


If you're up for it, shoot a short video of yourself either on Periscope or Twitter and share the link below. It's good to meet you all.


It wasn't until after I developed a system in my classroom for effective reflection and feedback that I realized the impact it truly had on learning. That probably sounds backward, but it's true. Although I always saw the value in reflecting personally, even if I didn't call it reflection, making it an essential part of the learning in my classroom didn't happen for a long time. As a teacher, I reflected in a number of ways, but it wasn't until I completed my National Board certification, where I had to record my lessons, watch them, and analyze them that I ...


Learning isn't easy, and we all have our challenges. Rather than assume our learners can't, giving them boring learning opportunities or watered-down versions of the learning, provide rigorous, engaging experiences and watch to see how much all students will grow.


We simply can't allow good enough to be good enough for our children. We all must work together to create a more conducive learning environment.


For some teachers, collaboration is cheating. In the real world, very little gets done by individuals.


Too often, we take risks ourselves, only letting some of the rope out for students to be more autonomous, but because we don't know what to do with ourselves while that is happening, we can sabotage perfectly good learning experiences.


It's time we start extending ourselves a little grace. If we continue to feel shame and guilt every time we make a mistake, we're not going to make it to June.


No one likes the feeling of dragging themselves out of bed to go to a job they just aren't feeling right now, and the best antidote to that is finding our flow.


While addressing reading-recovery fundamentals is vital, teaching readers the interpretive and social-emotional aspects of reading is also critically important.


The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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