April 2013 Archives

Guest post by Molly Donovan. So you've figured out that you want to teach. But do you know what kind of school is most appealing to you? There are over 130,000 K-12 schools in the United States--and over 3.7 million teachers who teach in them. You've heard people talk about public schools, charter schools, and independent schools--which of these educational environments is best for you? Of course, there is no universal "right" choice. All three types of schools offer their own advantages. In making your decision, the first step is to understand what, exactly, constitutes a public, an ...


Guest post by Connie Rath. This post was originally published in the March 21, 2013 TopSchoolJobs eXPO As a prospective teacher, you can distinguish yourself from a competitive applicant pool by understanding your own strengths and how to use them in the classroom to drive student achievement. Here are three ways to use your strengths to secure a teaching position: 1. Evaluate your strengths. A common misconception among prospective teachers is that candidates with the best academic records are the top candidates for teaching positions. However, many of the top teachers -- those who help students achieve gains each year ...


You've been applying, interviewing, hoping and waiting. Finally...you have a job offer! All that hard work has paid off. The district is sending you a contract. What next? The immediate response is to accept the offer and end the job-search agony. Is that wise? Not without careful deliberation and scrutiny. The first rule in accepting positions is to NEVER sign a contract without knowing its parameters. The second rule is to remember what other bloggers have warned: a contract is a binding legal document. Once you sign it, you are obligated to work for that district. Absolutely. No turning ...


It's your life. You'll spend an average of 6-7 hours a day in the classroom - and that doesn't count the endless hours at home devoted to designing lesson plans, grading papers, and creating projects. Deciding where to look for a teaching job is critical - but it can be confusing, scary, and frustrating. Let's face it: you can't all teach where you grew up or where you student-taught. Realistically, you're probably going to have to look at where the openings exist, if you're serious about landing a job in your field. This means that you need to plan ahead. ...


In this competitive teaching market, success is all about separating yourself from the pack. You can't just be a candidate - you have to be the best candidate. A summer job that will complement what you have been learning in the classroom is a great way to increase your value as a job applicant. Summer jobs can be useful in multiple aspects of your job search. Some of those are listed below. Resume: The right job can make your resume "pop" and rise to the top of the applicant pile. It can help you to build a work history that ...


Recent reports predict the demise of the job resume and the rise of Twitter, LinkedIn accounts and video resumes - all in the service of expediency. Employers and job seekers may well be moving in that direction, but at this time, the professional resume is still required in most educational environments. Indeed, technology, such as the Appli-tracks job application system, is incorporated into the recruitment process. Within such systems, however, employers continue to request the professional resume. Consequently, job seekers benefit from focusing on how to make their resumes stand out among the possible 20, 200 or even 1,000 ...


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  • jpaz: Great advice! I appreciate the reminder to focus on areas read more
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