April 2013 Archives

When I was a little girl my mom and dad always told me I could be anything I wanted to be if I worked hard to get there; a scientist, writer, doctor, mathematician, professor, etc. I luckily grew-up in a home where my gender never predicted my future. And as an engineer, my mom made sure I knew that math (and/or science) wasn't "just for boys." She would often talk about her high school algebra and calculus teacher, Sherman Blagg, who in the small Appalachian town of Ironton, Ohio, in the late 60's taught math to everyone in the ...


My colleagues and I stumbled across a unique HR term today that I just had to share... Offboarding Offboarding describes the process of managing employee exits. While not the most pleasant thought, offboarding is an important consideration for any organization, because all employees will leave at some point. They may do so voluntarily (e.g., retirement), be let go, or be faced with situations like downsizing, layoffs, and reductions in force. As its name suggests, offboarding is the opposite of onboarding (a.k.a induction, new employee socialization), which is the process of bringing new employees up to speed on ...


Today, The New Teacher Project (TNTP) released a report, Leap Year: Assessing and Supporting First-Year Teachers, that examines the unique characteristics of a teacher's initial year in the classroom. An interesting topic for sure; ask any educator about his or her first year of teaching, and chances are you'll hear at least one of the following descriptors: hectic, crazy, confusing, challenging, tough, hard, exhausting. So what is the best way to support these individuals and assess their progress? The study attempts to address this question by examining the performance of over 1,000 new teachers in hard-to-staff subjects located in ...


While researching compensation data last week, I stumbled upon some interesting information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics about the relationship between degrees, earnings, and employment. It is no surprise to see in the chart below that educational attainment is a strong predictor of employment and earnings. However, I dug deeper into the BLS data to find that 47 percent of individuals with a master's degree, professional degree, or doctoral degree currently work in the "education and health services" industry. The "professional and business services" industry is the second highest in educational attainment with only 17 percent of workers earning ...


The latest findings from the Gallup Poll offer some interesting insight around teacher well-being and the work environment for educators across the country. Based on telephone interviews conducted between January and December 2012 of more than 172,000 people--9,370 of whom identified themselves as K-12 teachers--Gallup found that out of 14 major career categories, teachers rank second in overall well-being, behind only physicians. As Brandon Busteed, Executive Director of Gallup Education, and Dr. Shane Lopez, Gallup Senior Scientist, note in their recent blog post, "Teaching May Be the Secret to a Good Life," teachers' high well-being is related to ...


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  • Brian Hansen: Great explanation of the flipped classroom! I'm starting to flip read more
  • Donte Kiryakoza: As usual, another great write up. Keep up the good read more
  • Leoma Dastrup: I don't actually concur with you on this, but still read more
  • Joshua: So, what are the solutions? I often see people decry read more
  • Jules Witherite: Great Job. fantasticread keep up the great work :) read more