Many students seem to forget that terms like “LOL” (Laugh out loud) and “ROTFL” (Rolling on the floor laughing) don’t belong in academic assignments. In fact, nearly two-thirds of 700 students surveyed in a recent study said their e-communication style sometimes finds its way into their schoolwork, according to the New York Times. Students said they sometimes omit proper punctuation and capitalization, use text shortcuts, and emoticons, according to the study. But while schools seek to assimilate new modes of writing, some experts see it as a non-issue. “I think this is not a worrying issue at all,” said ...


Where's George Orwell when you need him? Teachers at Cascade High School in Everett, Wash., are raising suspicions that their district may have used a surveillance camera to spy on a colleague who was fired last year. English and journalism teacher Kay Powers was terminated in June 2008 for allegedly helping students publish an underground newspaper using school equipment, in opposition to school orders, according to Everett's Daily Herald. Powers' attorneys believe that, in actuality, the district was retaliating against her for siding with students in a legal dispute concerning administrators’ oversight of the official student paper. Around the time ...


James Campbell, a retired teacher from Stirlingshire, Scotland, lost his claim in court that he was a victim of disability discrimination. According to BBC NEWS, Campbell, 61, said that his baldness was a disability that had a "substantial and long term adverse effect" on his teaching ability. He told the Glasgow court that the students equated his baldness with weakness, and that he shunned school hallways to avoid hearing students shout “baldy.” Since the students were able to taunt him to his face, he believed they were capable of assault. “How can I stand in front of a class with ...


Among the wide range of skills needed by today’s special education teachers, proficiency with technology may fast be rising to the top. According to an article in the Boston Globe, a growing movement known as “universal design” is spurring special educators to use advances in technology—whether in specialized devices or widely available Web programs—to give students with disabilities better access to mainstream curriculum units. Examples cited include remote-control switches that help wheelchair-bound students operate machinery; oral readers to help students with reading disabilities keep up with texts; and an online program called Voice Threads that lets users ...


The U.S. Department of Education, often criticized for focusing too narrowly on math and reading test scores, has awarded grants to 121 school districts to create professional development programs for history teachers on the use of primary sources, according to The Washington Post. The grants, given for three-year periods, range from $500,000 and $1 million. In past years, schools have used the money to give teachers opportunities to study documents with university professors, visit museums and historical sites, and—a nice touch—read books by important historians. According to the Post the grants are part of trend to ...


The cell phone video of a student's violent attack on Baltimore art teacher Jolita Berry has stunned viewers nationwide. But teachers in Baltimore say the incident was by no means unusual. “Believe me, this is not news to those of us who have worked in the schools,” said Ronda Cooperstein, a former teacher at Reginald F. Lewis High, the school where Berry was assaulted. “It’s a day-to-day problem, and if it doesn’t happen to me today, it might happen to you tomorrow.” That’s apparently no exaggeration. In Baltimore this year, according to the Baltimore Sun, 50 students ...


In 2004, Teri Hu, a California teacher was removed as the advisor for the student newspaper after it questioned the judgment of the school and a teacher, according to the San Francisco Gate. Last spring, it was widely reported that Amy Sorrell, an Indiana journalism teacher was placed on paid leave for insubordination and then transferred after the student newspaper ran an article advocating gay rights. The 1988 Supreme Court ruling, Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, allows principals and teachers to censor objectionable articles in public school newspapers, but what protects the many teachers who are demoted or lose their jobs in ...


The Lay Faculty Association, a teacher’s union representing over 450 lay educators in New York City Catholic schools, is threatening to strike when Pope Benedict XVI visits the city for the first time next week as pope, according to the Daily News. Union leaders have been negotiating for new contracts and have protested their comparatively low pay, which, coupled with rising costs of living, falls well below the average for public school teachers in the city. They’re hoping that the threat of a strike at a time when the Catholic Church is in the national spotlight can bring ...


A Facebook/MySpace war being waged at Horace Mann, an elite private school in New York City populated by children of the rich and powerful, is raising questions that even lesser mortals have been grappling with. For example: Who has the right to control online teacher taunting? In lurid detail, New York magazine describes the disturbing Internet hijinks played on Web sites, including Mann’s own Facebook group page, by the school’s students and their powerful parents who protect them. The imbroglio erupted at the high school after students posted lewd and exploitive comments about their teachers (one referring ...


Across the country people are sharing memories on the 40th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. Some are from the classroom. Betty Anderson, now the copy editor for the Seattle Times, recalls the less than positive response from her teachers in Alamaogordo, New Mexico when she and a group of junior high students wore black to mourn King’s assassination. “They made little remarks like, ‘We don’t have that kind of problem here, so why are you doing this?” Anderson also remembers when her music teacher canceled her choir’s performances after white parents complained about her ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Nancy Flanagan: A team of NEA-affiliate consultants: Ellen Holmes (ME), Jim Meadows read more
  • Tisha Rinker: Who was the presenter? read more
  • Susan Morrison: PD several times per week? Gasp! Are teachers to read more
  • Nancy: What a fantastic story! I hope the students are enjoying read more
  • Sclgoya: Education change, like fossil formation (http://www.k5geosource.org/content/dd/fossil/pg1.html (first page only)), can read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here